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PKMS Conference: Channeling Relations in Medieval England and France

Program Schedule:

8:00am Registration – Room 5105

9:00am Panel – Room 9205
NOTE ROOM CHANGE – 9204
The Language of Prison, the Prison of Language: Images of Enclosure and Expansion in the Ballades of Charles d’Orleans
Paola M. Rodriguez (The Graduate Center, CUNY)
Brief est a metre en escrit: 
Insular Textual Traditions of Thirteenth-Century French Lyric
Terrence Cullen (New York University)
Cest liure est a moy: Owning ‘French Books’ in Fifteenth-Century England
J.R. Mattison (University of Toronto)
Moderator: Sara Rychtarik (The Graduate Center, CUNY)

10:15am Coffe – Room 9205

10:30am Digital Presentation – Room 9205
Fordham University (Simon Parsons, Stephen Powell, Patrick DeBrosse, Amanda Racine)
Moderator: Michael Sargent (Queens College and The Graduate Center, CUNY)

11:15am Coffee – Room 9205

11:30am Panel – Room 9205
Channeling the Lore of St Hilary through the Cross-Channel Book Trade
Martha Rust (New York University)
Alain Chartier’s Le Quadrilogue invectif in England and Scotland: Diplomatic Affect and the Peaceable Conscience.
Sara Torres (University of Virginia)
Compiler Decisions: French and Latin in the early thirteenth-century Leges Anglorum Londiniis Collectae
Katherine Har (University of Oxford)
Moderator: Mark-Allan Donaldson (The Graduate Center, CUNY)

12:45pm Lunch Break

1:45pm Roundtable – Room 9205
Glenn Burger (Queens College and The Graduate Center, CUNY)
Deborah McGrady (University of Virginia)
Sara McDougall (John Jay College and The Graduate Center, CUNY)
Elizabeth Robertson (University of Glasgow)
Karl Steel (Brooklyn College and The Graduate Center, CUNY)
Moderator: Francesca Canade Sautman (Hunter College and The Graduate Center, CUNY)

2:45pm Coffee – Room 9205

3:00pm Panel – Room 9205
“[que] vos ditz gardiens del passage de Douere nous soeffrent passer…”: Late Medieval Englishwomen’s Francophone Culture.
Jocelyn Wogan-Browne (Fordham University)
Fantasies of Conquest: Political Marriage and the Assimilation of the East in Cliges and Bevis of Hampton
Wooree Heor (The Graduate Center, CUNY)
An Anglo-Norman Vision of Albina’s Empire
Alexander Baldassano (Queensborough Community College, CUNY)
Moderator: William Arguelles (The Graduate Center, CUNY)

4:15pm Coffee – Room 9205

4:30pm Keynote – Room 9205
Anglo-French: a translatable or untranslatable zone?
Ardis Butterfield (Yale University)
Introduction – Stephanie Grace-Petinos (University of Wisconsin-Madison)

5:30pm Reception – Room 5105

Organizers: Stephanie Grace-Petinos (University of Wisconsin-Madison); Deborah McGrady (University of Virginia); Elizabeth Roberston (University of Glasgow); Sara Rychtarik (Graduate Center, CUNY)
Sponsored by the Pearl Kibre Medieval Study, the Doctoral Students’ Council, the Henri Peyre French Institute, the Medieval Studies Certificate Program, the Ph.D. Program in Art History, the Ph.D. Program in English, and the Ph.D. Program in History

 

PKMS Conference: Channeling Relations in Medieval England and France

UPDATED CFP: Channeling Relations in Medieval England and France

Channeling Relations in Medieval England and France

Organizers: Stephanie Grace-Petinos (University of Wisconsin-Madison); Deborah McGrady (University of Virginia); Elizabeth Robertson (University of Glasgow); Sara Rychtarik (Graduate Center, CUNY)
Date: May 4, 2018
Location: CUNY Graduate Center
Keynote Speaker: Ardis Butterfield

For medievalists, interdisciplinary work has always been a necessity, and our major annual conferences reflect this need to broaden our understanding of the dynamic and widespread time period. While medieval scholars may specialize in one area of medieval studies, they also understand that separating traditions – by culture, language, religion, geographic borders, etc. – can create a limited and narrow understanding of the Middle Ages. This is especially the case for medievalists who study medieval England and France. Although, or perhaps because, they were frequently engaged in war, these two countries had many rich literary and cultural exchanges over the course of the Middle Ages. For Middle English scholars, French literature and music are often valuable resources for the sources of the works of popular authors such as Geoffrey Chaucer, and so are often read in medieval English classes. Yet why is Chaucer not routinely read in French departments? Or, on the other side, medieval English texts, law, as well as literature, were often written in French, not English. But British literature survey courses often limit their coverage of the Anglo-French corpus to one or two lais of Marie de France.

This one-day conference offers the opportunity for scholars, whether they usually preserve or cross departmental lines in their own work, to come together with scholars from departments with whom they may not routinely discuss academic work/research/approaches. While this conference focuses on literary and cultural exchanges between England and France, we are not discounting other traditions and welcome submissions for individual papers or full panel proposals that also incorporate other perspectives, particularly non-western.

Topics to be discussed can include, but are by no means limited to:

  • A text that belongs to both the English and French traditions
  • A text, legend or corpus of characters that exist with variations in each tradition
  • A textual theme shared by both traditions
  • A historical event that occurred in both traditions (i.e. The Hundred Years War)
  • Religious orders or religious figures prominent in both England and France
  • Historical or literary figures that travel throughout England and France
  • French texts that circulate within England; English texts that circulate within France; English and/or French texts that circulate within both England and France

This event is hosted by Pearl Kibre Medieval Study at the CUNY Graduate Center, with contributions by the Medieval Studies Certificate Program.

Please send abstracts of 250 words to pkmsconference@gmail.com by January 31, 2018.

CFP 2018 Conference Channeling Relations in Medieval England and France

Organizers: Stephanie Grace-Petinos (University of Wisconsin-Madison); Deborah McGrady (University of Virginia); Elizabeth Robertson (University of Glasgow); Sara Rychtarik (Graduate Center, CUNY)
Date: May 4, 2018
Location: CUNY Graduate Center
This event is hosted by Pearl Kibre Medieval Study at the CUNY Graduate Center

For medievalists, interdisciplinary work has always been a necessity, and our major annual conferences reflect this need to broaden our understanding of the dynamic and widespread time period. While medieval scholars may specialize in one area of medieval studies, they also understand that separating traditions – by culture, language, religion, geographic borders, etc. – can create a limited and narrow understanding of the Middle Ages. This is especially the case for medievalists who study medieval England and France. Although, or perhaps because, they were frequently engaged in war, these two countries had many rich literary and cultural exchanges over the course of the Middle Ages. For Middle English scholars, French literature and music are often valuable resources for the sources of the works of popular authors such as Geoffrey Chaucer, and so are often read in medieval English classes. Yet why is Chaucer not routinely read in French departments? Or, on the other side, medieval English texts, law, as well as literature, were often written in French, not English. But British literature survey courses often limit their coverage of the Anglo-French corpus to one or two lais of Marie de France.

This one-day conference offers the opportunity for scholars, whether they usually preserve or cross departmental lines in their own work, to come together with scholars from departments with whom they may not routinely discuss academic work/research/approaches. While this conference focuses on literary and cultural exchanges between England and France, we are not discounting other traditions and welcome submissions for individual papers or full panel proposals that also incorporate other perspectives, particularly non-western.

Topics to be discussed can include, but are by no means limited to:
– A text that belongs to both the English and French traditions
– A text, legend or corpus of characters that exist with variations in each tradition
– A textual theme shared by both traditions
– A historical event that occurred in both traditions (i.e. The Hundred Years War)
– Religious orders or religious figures prominent in both England and France
– Historical or literary figures that travel throughout England and France
– French texts that circulate within England; English texts that circulate within France; English and/or French texts that circulate within both England and France

Please send abstracts of 250 words to pkmsconference@gmail.com by December 31, 2017.

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