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PKMS Conference CFP

Crossing Boundaries: Towards an Interdisciplinary Medieval Studies

May 3, 2019 The Graduate Center, CUNY Keynote Speaker: Shirin Khanmohamadi, San Francisco State University The Pearl Kibre Medieval Study’s 14th annual conference in May will showcase a variety of scholarship with interdisciplinary or intersectional approaches. It will also consider the field of medieval studies in light of recent conversations such as those about Eurocentrism, racism, sexism, homophobia, and transphobia at Leeds and Kalamazoo. It will specifically seek to open spaces for graduate students and other potentially vulnerable members of academia to engage with the recent debates and other complicated and controversial topics. The 2018 PKMS conference explored the relationship between French and English departments, literatures, and cultures. The 2017-2018 workshop series focused on decentralizing Europe in medieval studies in our research and teaching. Medieval scholars often work across disciplines, but the institutional lack of communication across disciplinary borders has become more apparent recently, and the need to collapse those borders more urgent. The 2019 PKMS conference will expand those conversations beyond England and France, bringing together medieval scholars who work in various disciplines and with various methodologies for this day-long conversation, as the culmination of a year of graduate-student workshops on interdisciplinarity and intersectionality in medieval studies. We invite proposals for intersectional and/or interdisciplinary papers in medieval studies from all disciplines, regions, languages, methodologies, theoretical approaches, etc. We also welcome proposals for papers on the practical aspects, challenges, and benefits of interdisciplinary and intersectional work in medieval studies. Submit 250-word abstracts to medieval.study@gmail.com by December 31, 2018 JANUARY 31, 2019. Topics may include, but are not limited to:
  • Spatial, temporal, and disciplinary boundaries in medieval studies
  • The history of medieval studies
  • The “Global Middle Ages”
  • Global views of the European Middle Ages
  • Working with multiple languages
  • Working with translations and editions
  • Medieval translations and adaptations of texts
  • Studies in comparative religion
  • The politics of medievalism
  • Legal status of women in various regions, religions, etc.
  • Representations of women across multiple contexts
  • Medieval studies and a method of colonization
  • Similar traditions in Western and non-Western contexts
  • Digital Humanities in medieval studies
  • Medievalists and medicine / medieval medicine
  • Dis/ability in the Middle Ages
  • Medievalists teaching non-medieval topics and texts
  • Later uses of medieval music, art, and motifs
  • Medieval ideologies and constructions of identity surrounding gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity, religion, and social class

CFP: Race and Religion in the Middle Ages

The Pearl Kibre Medieval Study
Call for Papers

Race and Religion in the Middle Ages:
An Interdisciplinary Roundtable and Workshop

Wednesday, December 12, 2018
6-8pm

This roundtable will feature students from various disciplines discussing their work on race and religion in the Middle Ages.

To submit a proposal for a five-to-ten-minute presentation, email a 100-word abstract to medievalstudy@gmail.com by Friday, November 30, 2018.

Potential topics:

  • race and religion in medieval thought
  • religious world-maps
  • contemporary scholars and medieval race
  • racism in medieval studies
  • conversion and conversion narratives
  • interfaith marriage and relationships
  • inter-religious interactions and perceptions
  • whiteness and perceived whiteness
  • medieval race in the modern consciousness

CFP for 2019 Kalamazoo

Exchanging Cultures: Anglo-French Relations in the Middle Ages

Scholars agree that English and French, whether language, literature, or culture, had a strong relationship in the Middle Ages. Despite their mutual interactions and back-and-forth distribution of power, the portrayal of the relationship has remained fairly static, frequently described as French influence on English writing but not the other way around. Rather than a unidirectional influence, however, we should perhaps consider the relationship to be one of exchange. How might English ideas have influenced French ones? How might both peoples have viewed each other on a day-to-day level?
Because of traditional departmental divisions, it is difficult to satisfactorily answer these questions in a manner which incorporates both perspectives. Furthermore, there is a deep separation between lines of inquiry discussed by scholars in English and those discussed by scholars in French. Influenced by Channeling Relations in Medieval England and France, the conference hosted by the Pearl Kibre Medieval Study in 2018 which featured pioneers in the field Ardis Butterfield and Jocelyn Wogan-Browne, this panel aims to bring together these two traditionally separate groups for a conversation that is truly interdisciplinary.

While this panel focuses on literary and cultural exchanges between England and France, we welcome submissions that also incorporate other perspectives, particularly non-western.

Please submit abstracts to Steve Kruger at skruger@gc.cuny.edu

Tactics for Teaching Diverse Pasts: A Crowd-Sourced Online Compendium

(original post)

How do we share the diversity of the past with our students? How can we actively resist white supremacy, patriarchy, classism, homophobia, transphobia, and other modes of oppression? And how might we challenge evolutionary assumptions about progress and modernity which may play into students’ misformed notions of the past?

We would like propose a casual, informal, no-budget, open-access collection of teaching strategies for diversifying the study of early texts. We’re seeking concrete ideas that have worked in your literature classrooms: exercises, texts, critical lens, assignments, and other ideas. The goal is less polished writing than a kind of public brainstorming and sharing of ideas that work.

We’d like to request submissions that map out a single teaching idea that has worked in your classroom. Submit ideas using our online form before June 15, 2018.

Submissions should include the following information:
• Title
• Type of Institution
• What kind of class you’ve used this tactic in (upper- or lower-level, in-person or online, approximate size)
• The tactic itself
• Why and how it was effective, any problems you faced, and what you might do differently next time
• Amount of time required, in class and for any homework assignments

Submissions will be collected, organized, and uploaded to a website for others to use, adapt, and share.

Boyda Johnstone (Borough of Manhattan Community College/CUNY)

Matthew Harrison (West Texas A&M)

UPDATED CFP: Channeling Relations in Medieval England and France

Channeling Relations in Medieval England and France

Organizers: Stephanie Grace-Petinos (University of Wisconsin-Madison); Deborah McGrady (University of Virginia); Elizabeth Robertson (University of Glasgow); Sara Rychtarik (Graduate Center, CUNY)
Date: May 4, 2018
Location: CUNY Graduate Center
Keynote Speaker: Ardis Butterfield

For medievalists, interdisciplinary work has always been a necessity, and our major annual conferences reflect this need to broaden our understanding of the dynamic and widespread time period. While medieval scholars may specialize in one area of medieval studies, they also understand that separating traditions – by culture, language, religion, geographic borders, etc. – can create a limited and narrow understanding of the Middle Ages. This is especially the case for medievalists who study medieval England and France. Although, or perhaps because, they were frequently engaged in war, these two countries had many rich literary and cultural exchanges over the course of the Middle Ages. For Middle English scholars, French literature and music are often valuable resources for the sources of the works of popular authors such as Geoffrey Chaucer, and so are often read in medieval English classes. Yet why is Chaucer not routinely read in French departments? Or, on the other side, medieval English texts, law, as well as literature, were often written in French, not English. But British literature survey courses often limit their coverage of the Anglo-French corpus to one or two lais of Marie de France.

This one-day conference offers the opportunity for scholars, whether they usually preserve or cross departmental lines in their own work, to come together with scholars from departments with whom they may not routinely discuss academic work/research/approaches. While this conference focuses on literary and cultural exchanges between England and France, we are not discounting other traditions and welcome submissions for individual papers or full panel proposals that also incorporate other perspectives, particularly non-western.

Topics to be discussed can include, but are by no means limited to:

  • A text that belongs to both the English and French traditions
  • A text, legend or corpus of characters that exist with variations in each tradition
  • A textual theme shared by both traditions
  • A historical event that occurred in both traditions (i.e. The Hundred Years War)
  • Religious orders or religious figures prominent in both England and France
  • Historical or literary figures that travel throughout England and France
  • French texts that circulate within England; English texts that circulate within France; English and/or French texts that circulate within both England and France

This event is hosted by Pearl Kibre Medieval Study at the CUNY Graduate Center, with contributions by the Medieval Studies Certificate Program.

Please send abstracts of 250 words to pkmsconference@gmail.com by January 31, 2018.

A CFP of Possible Interest for Kalamazoo

Passing along for our colleagues at Rutgers:

Cultural and Literary Transmission in the Global Middle Ages (Kalamazoo 2017)

Sponsored by the Rutgers Program for Medieval Studies

Organizers: Izzy Stern and Erik Wade

Scholarship on the global Middle Ages has flourished in recent years, examining the role that a global community played in the medieval period. Such work demonstrates the remarkable links between various civilizations in the medieval period and the extent to which the Middle Ages truly were a hotbed of trade. Recent scholarship has considered the cultural interactions of trade, literary transmission, pilgrimage, religious conversion, explorers, colonization, and military expeditions. Building off of this work, this panel seeks to consider the role of intercultural interactions in the Middle Ages.

This panel seeks entries from all disciplines and invites applicants to interpret “interactions” broadly. Presenters may discuss literary interactions, military, exploratory, cultural, trade, political, religious, or anything else. Whether investigating the story of Abul-Abbas—the elephant given to the Carolingian Emperor Charlemagne by the Abbasid Caliph Harun al-Rashid—or the spread of coal-based iron production in eleventh-century China or the tenth-century journey of Ahmad ibn Fadlān from Baghdad through modern-day Uzbekistan and Kazakhstan to the camp of the Bulghār khan on the Volga river, papers may consider a variety of kinds of “interactions” in a globalized medieval period.

How did medieval writers and historians conceive of these interactions? How were these interactions recorded or remembered? How often was a particular story’s genealogy and foreign origins remembered, for example? What can we say about the trauma caused by these often violent interactions? How do these interactions help us reconceive of usually static terms such as “culture,” “country,” “nation,” and others? How did medieval people see themselves fitting in to the scale of the “global?” In modern depictions of the medieval world, how have these interactions been forgotten in the preservation of a white Middle Ages?

Please send questions, abstracts of 300 words, and participant information forms (http://www.wmich.edu/medievalcongress/submissions) to both Izzy Stern (isabel.stern@rutgers.edu) and Erik Wade (erik.wade@gmail.com) by September 10.

CFP for 2017 International Congress on Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo, MI

CFP: Persecution, Punishment, and Purgatory I-II: Methodological Considerations, Historical Explorations

Sponsored by the Medieval Studies Certificate Program, Graduate Center, CUNY

52nd International Congress on Medieval Studies, May 11-14, 2017, Kalamazoo, MI

Societies and cultures shape themselves in part through a series of exclusions, and those exclusions may involve both individual punishment and the persecution of particular groups. Of course, medieval societies and cultures had their own distinct modes of exclusion, punishment, and persecution. R.I. Moore famously, if controversially, argued for the “formation of a persecuting society” in the Central Middle Ages; interestingly, the same moment sees (in Jacques LeGoff’s terminology) “the birth of Purgatory.” These panels consider these issues in two different directions: methodological, asking how we read the limited documentary evidence to understand the position of the persecuted, as well as the persecutor, and historically, looking at representations in a variety of documents (e.g. trial records, art, and literature) to consider these questions through disparate methodologies (Please specify which panel you are applying to).

Please send 250-word abstract and PIF to skruger@gc.cuny.edu by September 15, 2016.

Topics might include, but certainly are not limited to:

  • the origins and uses of persecution
  • the experience of religious and ethnic pogroms
  • forced conversions and expulsions
  • persecution as a method of socio-cultural nation and identity formation
  • the character of legal and extra-legal punishment
  • punishment as a form of discipline
  • self-inflicted and devotional punishment
  • the role of punishment in the family
  • the variations of punishment based on class, status, and gender
  • punishment as social control
  • concepts of the afterlife
  • the relationship between sin/punishment and the afterlife
  • liminal spaces
  • peripheries

12th Annual PKMS Graduate Student Conference CFP

Pre-Modernisms: Friday, October 28th, The Graduate Center, CUNY

As the famous sayings go, everything old is new again, and history repeats itself. How many times have we heard someone described as a Renaissance man or woman, or something that seems old-fashioned called “medieval?” Scholars of these periods often find, of course, that such evaluations are, at best, inaccurate. However, trans-temporal approaches to study and even historical anachronisms can produce fruitful new inquiries into our fields, from contemporary children’s literature that engages in medievalisms to produce new fantasy worlds to queer and transgender studies that attempt to see the past from non-normative perspectives. This conference aims to bring together a wide variety of scholars of different disciplines and especially different time periods to pair what we know about the classical, medieval, and early modern periods with what later times perceive about these periods and how they manipulate the past for present agendas. As such, this conference is aimed not only at pre-modern scholars, but also at scholars of later and contemporary periods whose work engages in envisioning the past.

Please submit a 300-word abstract no later than September 15 at 5 PM.

E-mail: medieval.study@gmail.com

Topics may include, but are not limited to:

Arthurian Tradition

Early Book Collections

Architectural Styles

Medieval TV and Film

Children’s and Young Adult Literature

Historical Fiction

J.R.R. Tolkien

Historically Based Political Rhetoric

History of Marginal Perspectives

Law and the Legal Tradition

Renaissance Humanism

Philosophical Traditions

Renaissance Faires and Period Dress

Medieval and Early Modern Adaptations of Classical Texts

Premodern Recipes and Remedies

Contemporary Classroom Approaches

Linguistic Developments

Premodern Historiography (including history plays)

Call for Papers for 11th Annual PKMS Graduate Student Conference

“Sanctity and Sinfulness: Hagiographical Studies in Memory of Tom Head”

11th Annual Pearl Kibre Medieval Study Graduate Student Conference

The Pearl Kibre Medieval Study, the CUNY Graduate Center’s student-run organization for medieval studies, announces its eleventh annual Graduate Student Conference at the CUNY Graduate Center on Friday, February 26, 2016. This year’s conference is dedicated to the work and legacy of Thomas Head. We invite grad students to submit proposals.

The conference will look at how saints and their cults and relics were used to support and/or oppose political ambitions; examine how members of the ecclesiastical and secular hierarchies attempted to balance a desire for God’s peace with the realities of lordship; and explore the patronage of saints, ideals of sanctity, and issues of episcopal influence and its effect on local saints.

Submit a 300-word abstract by December 14th to medieval.study@gmail.com

Topics may include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Hagiography and hagiographers

  • Cults of saints

  • Ideals of sanctity

  • Peace and Truce of God

  • Secular appropriation of saints

  • Canonization and its process

  • Patronage of saints

  • Frankish lordship

  • Relics

  • Episcopal influence on local saints

We encourage papers to engage Tom’s scholarly legacy.

 

ICMS (Kalamazoo) 2015 Call for Papers: “Medieval Celebrations”

ICMS 2015 Panel

Medieval Celebrations

The people of the medieval world found plenty of reasons to celebrate and many ways to do so. They celebrated the seasons and the passage of time. They celebrated the life and resurrection of Christ and His host of saints. They celebrated kings and fools. They celebrated with formal ritual and with chaotic debauchery. This panel aims to identify the many forms of medieval celebration. Topics for presentations include but are not limited to:

•    Festivals, feasts, and food
•    Holy days and saints days
•    Forms of ritual
•    The Mass
•    Coronation
•    Baptisms, weddings, and funerals
•    Entertainment and performance
•    Agriculture and pagan vestiges
•    Markets
•    Mockery and foolery

Please submit your abstract of no more than 300 words by September 15, 2014.
Include your name and affiliation.
Papers must be 15-20 minutes in length.
Submissions should be emailed to medievalstudy@gmail.com

Call for Papers: “Persecution, Punishment and Purgatory in the Long Middle Ages”

10th Annual Pearl Kibre Medieval Study Graduate Student Conference

CUNY Graduate Center, New York, NY
November 7, 2014

Persecution, Punishment and Purgatory in the Long Middle Ages

The Pearl Kibre Medieval Study, the CUNY Graduate Center’s student-run organization for medieval studies, announces its tenth annual Graduate Student Conference at the CUNY Graduate Center on Friday, November 7, 2014. This year’s theme, Persecution, Punishment and Purgatory, is designed to address a number of methodological, historical, and theoretical issues within the diverse fields of medieval studies ranging from late antiquity to the early modern period. We invite grad students to submit proposals.

Submit a 300-word abstract by September 5th to medieval.study@gmail.com

Topics may include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Origins and uses of persecution
  • The result of religious and ethnic pogroms
  • Forced conversions and expulsions
  • Persecution as a method of socio-cultural nation and identity formation
  • The character of legal and extra-legal punishment,
  • Punishment as a form of discipline
  • Self-inflicted punishment
  • The role of punishment in the family
  • The variations of punishment based on class, status, and gender
  • Punishment as social control
  • Concepts of the afterlife
  • The relationship between sin/punishment and the afterlife
  • Liminal spaces
  • Peripheries

Call for Papers: Medieval Celebrations

9th Annual Pearl Kibre Medieval Study Graduate Student Conference
CUNY Graduate Center, New York, NY
February 28, 2014

“Medieval Celebrations”

The Pearl Kibre Medieval Study, CUNY Graduate Center’s student-run organization for medieval studies, is hosting their ninth annual graduate student conference: Medieval Celebrations. We invite grad students to submit proposals about celebrations of all kinds.

Topics for presentations include but are not limited to:
·       Festivals, feasts, and food
·       Holy days and saints days
·       Forms of ritual
·       The Mass
·       Coronation
·       Baptisms, weddings, and funerals
·       Entertainment and performance
·       Agriculture and pagan vestiges
·       Markets
·       Mockery and foolery

We also invite grad student performers of medieval music or dramatic arts to submit proposals for short performances (up to 30 minutes; please include estimation of time).

Please submit your abstract of no more than 300 words by Nov. 30 Dec. 13, 2013.
Include your name and affiliation.
Papers must be 15-20 minutes in length, and performances no more than 30 minutes.
Submissions should be emailed to medievalstudy@gmail.com

Call for Papers: Medieval Congress 2014

The Pearl Kibre Medieval Study is currently accepting abstracts for its panel at the 49th International Congress on Medieval Studies at Kalamazoo (May 8 – 11, 2014) titled: “New Media and the Medieval Ages.”

The field of medieval studies has a relatively long and recognized history of scholarship assisted by technology. One of the first to merge new advances in technology with humanities scholarship was a medievalist, Fr. Roberto Busa, who in the 1940s conceived and developed the Index Thomisticus—a tool for performing text searches within the massive corpus of Aquinas’s works—in collaboration with IBM. Today dozens of digital resources are available for the medievalist: online collections of digitized manuscript images, full-text databases, online scholarly editions, and tens of thousands of books and journals.  One of the more recent and popular trends amongst medievalists in new media technology is the transformation of widely conceived medieval texts and data into new forms of media and technology. Projects such as Piers Plowman Electronic Archive and the Mapping Medieval Chester project exemplify only a few of the innovative applications of new media to our study of the medieval world.

Shared amongst these projects’ use of digital tools is an emphasis on remediation, taking data in one form and transforming and transposing it into another form of usable media. Additionally, through a greater focus on developments in contemporary technology, or as result of its proliferation, scholars and researchers have also become more attuned to the use, development, and creation of medieval technologies in the contexts of the written word, manuscripts, works of art, music, architecture, warfare, urban planning, and others.  The panel “New Media and the Middle Ages” aims at addressing some of the key concepts, questions, and methodologies concerning the convergences between developments in both new and old technologies and our study of the medieval past. Papers might address such questions as:  What insights might digital humanities allow in our study of medieval texts, architecture, music, manuscripts, and art?  What kinds of multimedia objects or events existed in the medieval period, and how might we as modern scholars still have access to them? What are the consequences of considering medieval manuscripts, texts, and works of art as multimedia works?

Other topics for presentations include:

  • Translation and dictionary projects
  • Digital projects in the visual and performance arts
  • Encoding of medieval manuscripts and printed texts
  • Management and preservation of digital resources
  • The cultural impact of the new media
  • The role of digital humanities in academic curricula
  • Funding and sustainability of long-term projects

Please submit your abstract of no more than 300 words by September 15, 2013.
Include your name and affiliation.
Papers must be 15-20 minutes in length.
Submissions should be emailed to medievalstudy@gmail.com along with a completed participant information form (found at http://www.wmich.edu/medieval/congress/submissions/index.html)

Pearl Kibre Medieval Study, Medieval Studies Certificate Program
CUNY Graduate Center, New York, NY

CFP: New Media and the Middle Ages

*Deadline extended to December 7, 2012.*

“New Media and the Middle Ages”
8th Annual Pearl Kibre Medieval Study Graduate Student Conference
CUNY Graduate Center, New York, NY
March 1, 2013, 10am-4pm

The field of medieval studies has a relatively long and recognized history of scholarship assisted by technology. The 2013 PKMS Graduate Student Conference aims at addressing some of the key concepts, questions, and methodologies concerning the convergences between developments in both new and old technologies and our study of the medieval past.

One of the first to merge new advances in technology with humanities scholarship was a medievalist, Fr. Roberto Busa, who in the 1940s conceived and developed the Index Thomisticus, a tool for performing text searches within the massive corpus of Aquinas’s works, in collaboration with IBM. Today dozens of digital resources are available for the medievalist: online collections of digitized manuscript images, full- text databases, online scholarly editions, and tens of thousands of books and journals. One of the more recent and popular trends amongst medievalists in new media technology is the transformation of medieval texts and data- widely conceived- into new forms of media and technology. Projects such as Piers Plowman Electronic Archive and the Mapping Medieval Chester project exemplify only a few of the innovative applications of new media to our study of the medieval world. Shared amongst these projects’ use of digital tools is an emphasis on remediation, taking data in one form and transforming and transposing it into another form of usable media. Additionally, through a greater focus on developments in contemporary technology, or as result of its proliferation, scholars and researchers have also become more attuned to the use, development, and creation of medieval technologies in the contexts of the written word, manuscripts, works of art, music, architecture, warfare, urban planning, and others.

Papers might address such questions as: What insights might digital humanities allow in our study of medieval texts, architecture, music, manuscripts, and art? What kinds of multimedia objects or events existed in the medieval period, and how might we as modern scholars still have access to them? What are the consequences of considering medieval manuscripts, texts, and works of art as multimedia works?

Other topics for presentations may include:

· Translation and dictionary projects

· Digital projects in the visual and performance arts

· Encoding of medieval manuscripts and printed texts

· Management and preservation of digital resources

· The cultural impact of new media

· The role of digital humanities in academic curricula

· Funding and sustainability of long-term projects

Graduate students, please submit your abstract of no more than 300 words by
December 7, 2012.
Include your name and affiliation.
Papers must be 15-20 minutes in length.
Submissions should be emailed to medievalstudy@gmail.com

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