CFP for 2019 Kalamazoo

Exchanging Cultures: Anglo-French Relations in the Middle Ages

Scholars agree that English and French, whether language, literature, or culture, had a strong relationship in the Middle Ages. Despite their mutual interactions and back-and-forth distribution of power, the portrayal of the relationship has remained fairly static, frequently described as French influence on English writing but not the other way around. Rather than a unidirectional influence, however, we should perhaps consider the relationship to be one of exchange. How might English ideas have influenced French ones? How might both peoples have viewed each other on a day-to-day level?
Because of traditional departmental divisions, it is difficult to satisfactorily answer these questions in a manner which incorporates both perspectives. Furthermore, there is a deep separation between lines of inquiry discussed by scholars in English and those discussed by scholars in French. Influenced by Channeling Relations in Medieval England and France, the conference hosted by the Pearl Kibre Medieval Study in 2018 which featured pioneers in the field Ardis Butterfield and Jocelyn Wogan-Browne, this panel aims to bring together these two traditionally separate groups for a conversation that is truly interdisciplinary.

While this panel focuses on literary and cultural exchanges between England and France, we welcome submissions that also incorporate other perspectives, particularly non-western.

Please submit abstracts to Steve Kruger at skruger@gc.cuny.edu

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Tactics for Teaching Diverse Pasts: A Crowd-Sourced Online Compendium

(original post)

How do we share the diversity of the past with our students? How can we actively resist white supremacy, patriarchy, classism, homophobia, transphobia, and other modes of oppression? And how might we challenge evolutionary assumptions about progress and modernity which may play into students’ misformed notions of the past?

We would like propose a casual, informal, no-budget, open-access collection of teaching strategies for diversifying the study of early texts. We’re seeking concrete ideas that have worked in your literature classrooms: exercises, texts, critical lens, assignments, and other ideas. The goal is less polished writing than a kind of public brainstorming and sharing of ideas that work.

We’d like to request submissions that map out a single teaching idea that has worked in your classroom. Submit ideas using our online form before June 15, 2018.

Submissions should include the following information:
• Title
• Type of Institution
• What kind of class you’ve used this tactic in (upper- or lower-level, in-person or online, approximate size)
• The tactic itself
• Why and how it was effective, any problems you faced, and what you might do differently next time
• Amount of time required, in class and for any homework assignments

Submissions will be collected, organized, and uploaded to a website for others to use, adapt, and share.

Boyda Johnstone (Borough of Manhattan Community College/CUNY)

Matthew Harrison (West Texas A&M)

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Lone Medievalist Course (Re)Design Workshop

Reposting from the Lone Medievalist Facebook page:

Have a medieval-focused course you want to design or redesign for the next academic year? Would you like to workshop it…

Posted by The Lone Medievalist on Monday, May 14, 2018

Have a medieval-focused course you want to design or redesign for the next academic year? Would you like to workshop it with others? Join the Lone Medievalist Course (Re)Design Workshop!

The philosophy this workshop is based on is Backward Design, a pedagogical approach that begins with course goals and outcomes before moving into instructional strategies, assignments, and assessment. We will workshop through the method with the goal of providing feedback, ideas, and suggestions for participants to consider as they work on a chosen course.

When: July 16-August 10th (four weeks)

Format: There will be two synchronous Google Hangout meeting times scheduled per week (possibly Mondays and Thursdays, time depending on those who sign up), but participants can choose one to attend (unless you want to be in both!). The two times are to increase the chances for participation. They will have the same focus each week. In addition, there will be asynchronous opportunities to provide and receive feedback as well as take a look at suggested readings and materials.

– Week 1: Backward Design and Course Goals/Outcomes
– Week 2: Instructional Strategies
– Week 3: Learning Activities and Assignments
– Week 4: Feedback and Assessment

Facilitator: Kisha Tracy, in addition to being the co-founder of Lone Medievalist and Associate Professor of English Studies, is also the Co-Coordinator of the Center for Teaching and Learning at Fitchburg State in Massachusetts. In this capacity, she facilitates numerous course (re)design workshops for faculty. She also teaches a graduate course on Learner-Centered Assessment for a higher education teaching certificate program. Given this experience, she decided to run a workshop just for medievalists wanting to (re)design a course in a workshop environment in order to get feedback from others!

Sign Up/Questions: Please email Kisha at ktracy3@fitchburgstate.edu if you would like to sign up for the workshop or have any questions!

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PKMS Conference: Channeling Relations in Medieval England and France

Program Schedule:

8:00am Registration – Room 5105

9:00am Panel – Room 9205
NOTE ROOM CHANGE – 9204
The Language of Prison, the Prison of Language: Images of Enclosure and Expansion in the Ballades of Charles d’Orleans
Paola M. Rodriguez (The Graduate Center, CUNY)
Brief est a metre en escrit: 
Insular Textual Traditions of Thirteenth-Century French Lyric
Terrence Cullen (New York University)
Cest liure est a moy: Owning ‘French Books’ in Fifteenth-Century England
J.R. Mattison (University of Toronto)
Moderator: Sara Rychtarik (The Graduate Center, CUNY)

10:15am Coffe – Room 9205

10:30am Digital Presentation – Room 9205
Fordham University (Simon Parsons, Stephen Powell, Patrick DeBrosse, Amanda Racine)
Moderator: Michael Sargent (Queens College and The Graduate Center, CUNY)

11:15am Coffee – Room 9205

11:30am Panel – Room 9205
Channeling the Lore of St Hilary through the Cross-Channel Book Trade
Martha Rust (New York University)
Alain Chartier’s Le Quadrilogue invectif in England and Scotland: Diplomatic Affect and the Peaceable Conscience.
Sara Torres (University of Virginia)
Compiler Decisions: French and Latin in the early thirteenth-century Leges Anglorum Londiniis Collectae
Katherine Har (University of Oxford)
Moderator: Mark-Allan Donaldson (The Graduate Center, CUNY)

12:45pm Lunch Break

1:45pm Roundtable – Room 9205
Glenn Burger (Queens College and The Graduate Center, CUNY)
Deborah McGrady (University of Virginia)
Sara McDougall (John Jay College and The Graduate Center, CUNY)
Elizabeth Robertson (University of Glasgow)
Karl Steel (Brooklyn College and The Graduate Center, CUNY)
Moderator: Francesca Canade Sautman (Hunter College and The Graduate Center, CUNY)

2:45pm Coffee – Room 9205

3:00pm Panel – Room 9205
“[que] vos ditz gardiens del passage de Douere nous soeffrent passer…”: Late Medieval Englishwomen’s Francophone Culture.
Jocelyn Wogan-Browne (Fordham University)
Fantasies of Conquest: Political Marriage and the Assimilation of the East in Cliges and Bevis of Hampton
Wooree Heor (The Graduate Center, CUNY)
An Anglo-Norman Vision of Albina’s Empire
Alexander Baldassano (Queensborough Community College, CUNY)
Moderator: William Arguelles (The Graduate Center, CUNY)

4:15pm Coffee – Room 9205

4:30pm Keynote – Room 9205
Anglo-French: a translatable or untranslatable zone?
Ardis Butterfield (Yale University)
Introduction – Stephanie Grace-Petinos (University of Wisconsin-Madison)

5:30pm Reception – Room 5105

Organizers: Stephanie Grace-Petinos (University of Wisconsin-Madison); Deborah McGrady (University of Virginia); Elizabeth Roberston (University of Glasgow); Sara Rychtarik (Graduate Center, CUNY)
Sponsored by the Pearl Kibre Medieval Study, the Doctoral Students’ Council, the Henri Peyre French Institute, the Medieval Studies Certificate Program, the Ph.D. Program in Art History, the Ph.D. Program in English, and the Ph.D. Program in History

 

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PKMS Conference: Channeling Relations in Medieval England and France

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Decentralizing Europe in Medieval Studies

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UPDATED CFP: Channeling Relations in Medieval England and France

Channeling Relations in Medieval England and France

Organizers: Stephanie Grace-Petinos (University of Wisconsin-Madison); Deborah McGrady (University of Virginia); Elizabeth Robertson (University of Glasgow); Sara Rychtarik (Graduate Center, CUNY)
Date: May 4, 2018
Location: CUNY Graduate Center
Keynote Speaker: Ardis Butterfield

For medievalists, interdisciplinary work has always been a necessity, and our major annual conferences reflect this need to broaden our understanding of the dynamic and widespread time period. While medieval scholars may specialize in one area of medieval studies, they also understand that separating traditions – by culture, language, religion, geographic borders, etc. – can create a limited and narrow understanding of the Middle Ages. This is especially the case for medievalists who study medieval England and France. Although, or perhaps because, they were frequently engaged in war, these two countries had many rich literary and cultural exchanges over the course of the Middle Ages. For Middle English scholars, French literature and music are often valuable resources for the sources of the works of popular authors such as Geoffrey Chaucer, and so are often read in medieval English classes. Yet why is Chaucer not routinely read in French departments? Or, on the other side, medieval English texts, law, as well as literature, were often written in French, not English. But British literature survey courses often limit their coverage of the Anglo-French corpus to one or two lais of Marie de France.

This one-day conference offers the opportunity for scholars, whether they usually preserve or cross departmental lines in their own work, to come together with scholars from departments with whom they may not routinely discuss academic work/research/approaches. While this conference focuses on literary and cultural exchanges between England and France, we are not discounting other traditions and welcome submissions for individual papers or full panel proposals that also incorporate other perspectives, particularly non-western.

Topics to be discussed can include, but are by no means limited to:

  • A text that belongs to both the English and French traditions
  • A text, legend or corpus of characters that exist with variations in each tradition
  • A textual theme shared by both traditions
  • A historical event that occurred in both traditions (i.e. The Hundred Years War)
  • Religious orders or religious figures prominent in both England and France
  • Historical or literary figures that travel throughout England and France
  • French texts that circulate within England; English texts that circulate within France; English and/or French texts that circulate within both England and France

This event is hosted by Pearl Kibre Medieval Study at the CUNY Graduate Center, with contributions by the Medieval Studies Certificate Program.

Please send abstracts of 250 words to pkmsconference@gmail.com by January 31, 2018.

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CFP 2018 Conference Channeling Relations in Medieval England and France

Organizers: Stephanie Grace-Petinos (University of Wisconsin-Madison); Deborah McGrady (University of Virginia); Elizabeth Robertson (University of Glasgow); Sara Rychtarik (Graduate Center, CUNY)
Date: May 4, 2018
Location: CUNY Graduate Center
This event is hosted by Pearl Kibre Medieval Study at the CUNY Graduate Center

For medievalists, interdisciplinary work has always been a necessity, and our major annual conferences reflect this need to broaden our understanding of the dynamic and widespread time period. While medieval scholars may specialize in one area of medieval studies, they also understand that separating traditions – by culture, language, religion, geographic borders, etc. – can create a limited and narrow understanding of the Middle Ages. This is especially the case for medievalists who study medieval England and France. Although, or perhaps because, they were frequently engaged in war, these two countries had many rich literary and cultural exchanges over the course of the Middle Ages. For Middle English scholars, French literature and music are often valuable resources for the sources of the works of popular authors such as Geoffrey Chaucer, and so are often read in medieval English classes. Yet why is Chaucer not routinely read in French departments? Or, on the other side, medieval English texts, law, as well as literature, were often written in French, not English. But British literature survey courses often limit their coverage of the Anglo-French corpus to one or two lais of Marie de France.

This one-day conference offers the opportunity for scholars, whether they usually preserve or cross departmental lines in their own work, to come together with scholars from departments with whom they may not routinely discuss academic work/research/approaches. While this conference focuses on literary and cultural exchanges between England and France, we are not discounting other traditions and welcome submissions for individual papers or full panel proposals that also incorporate other perspectives, particularly non-western.

Topics to be discussed can include, but are by no means limited to:
– A text that belongs to both the English and French traditions
– A text, legend or corpus of characters that exist with variations in each tradition
– A textual theme shared by both traditions
– A historical event that occurred in both traditions (i.e. The Hundred Years War)
– Religious orders or religious figures prominent in both England and France
– Historical or literary figures that travel throughout England and France
– French texts that circulate within England; English texts that circulate within France; English and/or French texts that circulate within both England and France

Please send abstracts of 250 words to pkmsconference@gmail.com by December 31, 2017.

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Teaching the Middle Ages Workshop Documents and Resources

Lesson Plan Workshop with Paola Ureni

Points to consider:
Connect to our time for student interest

Medieval and Now shares common ideas (mind, soul, individual, etc.)

Greater complexity in those concepts for Medieval

Helpful links

http://medievalhighered.omeka.net/

This site is a collection of materials for teaching medieval classes. Particularly recommended is the Medieval or Modern questionaire. (Note: may require registration).

https://globalchaucers.wordpress.com/

A blog which explores the impact of Chaucer’s works around the world. Includespedagogical ideas and resources, such as “Teaching the Wife of Bath through Adaptation.”

Useful texts (not necessarily medieval)

“Why Read the Classics” Italo Calvino http://www.nybooks.com/articles/1986/10/09/why-read-the-classics/

Jeffrey Jerome Cohen “Monster Culture (Seven Theses)”

For teaching the Gothic

Eve Sedgwick The Coherence of Gothic Conventions (used with Scooby-Doo episodes)

Writing instruction materials

Gaipa_Engaging-Sources

GordonHarvey

Sample syllabi

F15-syllabus-338(1)

CHAUCS15(1)

Alberghini.371

Sample lesson plans

lessonplanjephthahsdaughterlessonplanonchaucerandplagiarism lesson plans – lanval and the wanderer Beowulf OE guidelines

https://www.cynthiarogers.info/game-of-love-handout

Stay tuned for information about our final workshop of the semester.

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Conference Full Schedule with Participants

9:30: Registration

 

10:00: Panel One | Looking Back at Looking Back: Pre-Modern Views of the Past

Moderator:  Alexander Baldassano, CUNY Graduate Center

 

Classicisms and Medievalisms in the Songs of Raimbaut de Vaqueiras

Clare Wilson, CUNY Graduate Center

 

Poking Holes in the Walls of the Patriarchy: The Pyramus and Thisbe Myth in Chaucer and Shakespeare

Jennifer Alberghini, CUNY Graduate Center

 

For Your Reference (and Reverence): Illustrated Relic Directories and German Media Theory for the Late Middle Ages

Christian Whitworth, Tufts University

 

Coffee Break

 

11:30: Panel Two | Enlightening Students about the Dark Ages: Teaching with Pre-Modernisms

Moderator: Allen Strouse, CUNY Graduate Center

 

Shame! Shame! Shame! Teaching Puritanism with The Game of Thrones

Christina Katopodis, CUNY Graduate Center

 

Introducing Witch Diction: An Investigation and Analysis of the Pedagogical Presentation of Witchcraft in the Undergraduate Historical Seminar Setting

Ryan Kelly, Eastern University

 

12:30: Lunch Break

 

1:30: Panel Three | Young and Modern: Depictions of the Medieval from Tolkien to Today

Moderator: Mary Jean McNamara, CUNY Graduate Center

 

Fighting the Past: Medieval Dragons in Children’s and YA Literature

Esther Bernstein, CUNY Graduate Center

 

Tolkien’s Unstable Machinery: The Lord of the Rings as Mimetic History

Micheal Angelo Rumore, CUNY Graduate Center

 

Compression Dangerous and Beautiful: Incest as Intimate Politics in Elizabeth E. Wein’s The Winter Prince

Rebecca Fullan, CUNY Graduate Center

 

Break

 

3:00: Keynote | TRANSTEMPORALITIES: Freud and Mehmed II @ Troy

Kathleen Biddick, Temple University

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